Pittsburgh Bridges

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A 2006 study determined that Pittsburgh has 446 bridges, and with its proximity to three major rivers and countless hills and ravines, Pittsburgh is known as "The City of Bridges". Pittsburgh is the world record holder for bridges with piers and stands contained entirely within city limits, beating out Venice, Italy, the previous record holder by 3 bridges. There are many more bridges in Pittsburgh that are not counted toward the world record as they lack piers.

#1 - 16th Street Bridge-1922
The 16th Street Bridge is a through arch bridge that spans the Allegheny River. The bridge was constructed in 1922, and became eligible for National Register status in 1979. The bridge stretches a length of 1900 feet and a width of 40 feet. The bridge stands 41.3 feet above the water, with a span of 437 feet between supports, and carries 4 lanes of traffic and two lanes of walkers.
Coordinants: 40.451700, -79.990900
#2 - Rachel Carson Bridge-1926
This bridge, also known as the Ninth Street Bridge, spans the Allegheny River. It was renamed in 2006, for naturalist and Pittsburgh native, Rachel Carson. The bridge opened on November 26, 1926, making it the second of the three sisters bridges. The bridge stretches a length of 840 feet, with a 256 feet span between supports, and sits 78 feet above the water.
Coordinants: 40.446700, -79.999800
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rachel_Carson_Bridge
#3 - Andy Warhol Bridge-1926
This bridge, also known as the Seventh Street Bridge, spans the Allegheny River, and is the only bridge in the United States named for a visual artist. The bridge stretches a length of 1,061 feet, with a 442 feet span between supports, and sits 78feet above the water. This bridge, completed in June 1926, is the oldest of the three sisters bridges, and has the first self-anchored suspension span built in the United States.
Coordinants: 40.446111, -80.001389
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Warhol_Bridge
#4 - Roberto Clemente Bridge-1928
This bridge, also called the Sixth Street Bridge, spans the Allegheny River. Named for the Pittsburgh Pirates baseball player Roberto Clemente, it is one of three parallel bridges called The Three Sisters. The three sisters are significant because they are the only trio of nearly identical bridges.
Coordinants: 40.445600, -80.003300
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roberto_Clemente_Bridge
#5 - Fort Duquesne Bridge-1969
The Fort Duquesne Bridge is a steel tied arch bridge that spans the Allegheny River. The bridge stretches a length of xxxxx feet, with a 430 feet span between supports, and sits 46 feet above the water. The bridge was given the name "The Bridge to Nowhere" because the main span was finished in 1963, but the northwestern ramps were not completed until 1969. In 1964, a student at the University of Pittsburgh drove a station wagon off the end of the bridge and landed unhurt on the other side. Its predecessor was the Manchester bridge.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Duquesne_Bridge
Coordinants: 40.444138, -80.009179
#6 - West End Bridge-1932
The West End Bridge is a steel bowstring arch bridge over the Ohio River. The bridge stretches a length of 1,978.75 feet, with a 780 feet span between supports, and sits 66 feet above the water. The bridge was built from 1930 to 1932 primarily by the American Bridge Company (superstructure) and the Foundation Company (substructure).
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_End_Bridge_%28Pittsburgh%29
Coordinants: 40.446310, -80.026990
#7 - Fort Pitt Bridge-1959
The Fort Pitt Bridge is a steel, 8 lane (4 on top, 4 on bottom), double decker bowstring arch bridge that spans the Monongahela River. The bridge stretches a length of 1,207 feet, with a 750 feet span between supports, and sits 47.1 feet above the water. The Fort Pitt Bridge opened on June 19, 1959, and its predecessor bridge, the Point Bridge, closed 2 days later. The Fort Pitt Bridge is also part of a sequence from The Song Remains the Same (1976), a documentary of Led Zeppelin's 1973 tour.
Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Pitt_Bridge
Coordinants: 40.438830, -80.011130
#8 - Smithfield Street Bridge-1883
The Smithfield Street Bridge is a lenticular truss bridge crossing the Monongahela River. The bridge stretches a length of 1,184 feet, with two 360 ft spans between supports, and sits 42.5 feet above the water. The present bridge is the third bridge at the site, constructed on the foundation of the second bridge. It was built between 1881-83, and opened in 1883, making it the oldest steel bridge in the United States. It was widened in 1889 and widened again in 1911.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smithfield_Street_Bridge
Coordinants: 40.435135, -80.001957
#9 - Liberty Bridge-1928
Liberty Bridge was constructed as the missing link between downtown and Liberty Tunnel, which had been constructed four years earlier in 1924 as a link to the South Hills. The bridge stretches a length of 2,663 feet, with two 448 ft spans between supports, and sits 66 feet above the water. It opened on March 27, 1928 after a 5 mile vehicle parade, starting at the southern suburbs of the city and ending at the southern end of the new bridge.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberty_Bridge_%28Pittsburgh%29
Coordinants: 40.432800, -79.996776
#10 - Birmingham Bridge-1977
The Birmingham Bridge is a tied arch bridge, which crosses over the Monongahela River. The bridge stretches a length of 1,662 feet, with a 607ft span between supports, and sits 64.8 feet above the water. During construction, Pittsburgh Police and Fire responded to a construction worker who had pinned his leg near the top of the span. After attempting unsuccessful rescues, they finally hoisted a surgeon to the site and were forced to amputate on site to save the workers life.
Coordinants: 40.433684, -79.973398

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