Name City State Zip Author Rating
Pittsburgh Bridges
A 2006 study determined that Pittsburgh has 446 bridges, and with its proximity to three major rivers and countless hills and ravines, Pittsburgh is known as "The City of Bridges". Pittsburgh is the world record holder for bridges with piers and stands contained entirely within city limits, beating out Venice, Italy, the previous record holder by 3 bridges. There are many more bridges in Pittsburgh that are not counted toward the world record as they lack piers.
PittsburghPA15226Alex
DC Memorials Pt. 1-The Mall
Washington, D.C. is a planned city. The design for the City of Washington was largely the work of Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant, a French-born architect who arrived during the American Revolutionary War. The architecture of Washington varies greatly. Six of the top 10 buildings in the American Institute of Architects' 2007 ranking of "America's Favorite Architecture" are located in the District of Columbia, including the Lincoln, Jefferson, and Vietnam memorial.
Washington D.C.DC20037Alex
DC Memorials Pt. 2
Washington, D.C. is a planned city. The design for the City of Washington was largely the work of Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant, a French-born architect who arrived during the American Revolutionary War. The architecture of Washington varies greatly. Six of the top 10 buildings in the American Institute of Architects' 2007 ranking of "America's Favorite Architecture" are located in the District of Columbia, including the Lincoln, Jefferson, and Vietnam memorial.
Washington D.C.DC20037Alex
Key West
Key West has more to offer than just Key Lime Pie- They also sell chocolate covered key lime pie and key lime pie on a stick. In all honesty, though, Key West offers something for everyone: unique landmarks, beaches, good food, and even 6 toed cats. Key West is a great place to visit, and one of the few places in the United States where you can see roosters roaming the streets
Key WestFL33040Alex
Cleveland
Cleveland is the second largest city in Ohio, located along the Lake Erie shoreline and divided by the Cuyahoga River. In 1870, John D. Rockefeller founded Standard Oil in Cleveland, but later moved it to New York City. Although the city was founded on manufacturing, it has a lot to offer its visitors. Nestled inside the city is Case Western Reserve University, which is surrounded by several of the city's public museums.
ClevelandOH44106Alex
Historic Hudson
Hudson was named after its founder, David Hudson who settled here in 1799. In 2008, the population was estimated to be 23,037, making it the 389th largest city in the midwest.
HudsonOH44236Alex
Historic Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor was founded in 1824, and the University of Michigan moved from Detroit to Ann Arbor in 1837. Since then, the city has shown steady growth. Although much of the city has been impacted by the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor has a rich history of it's own. Follow this tour through Ann Arbor to see some of the historical sites at the University of Michigan and the greater Ann Arbor area.
Ann ArborMI48104Alex B
Rochester-Lost History
Much of Rochester's history has been lost to time. Water, once the workhouse of Rochester: powering numerous mills along the riverfront, is now an aesthetic pleasure. This tour will guide you to the locations that played a key role in shaping Rochester but have since vanished. Some of Rochester's most glorious attractions, such as a five story sugar mill, have almost been forgotten.
RochesterMI48307Alex
Historic Rochester
Rochester is a lively city with a rich history. The Village of Rochester was formed on April 12, 1869, and became a city in 196, but the first settlers arrived as early as 1817. According to the US Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.9 mi and a population of 11,002.
RochesterMI48307Alex
Taste of Rochester
Rochester is a lively city with a rich history (See the "Historic Rochester" tour for more info). The Village of Rochester was formed on April 12, 1869, and became a city in 1966. According to the US Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.9 mi and a population of 11,002. The most popular attraction in Rochester is the festival of lights . Each year, around the holidays, every storefront is covered with a wall of Christmas lights.
RochesterMI48307Alex
Rochester Hill Public Library
Welcome to the Historic Rochester photo scavenger hunt.

This activity will help to teach you about some of the stars in Rochester's history--the people, places, and things that helped to shape Rochester and make it the great city that it is today. To complete this activity, find each of the historic sites listed below and take a picture of yourselves at that site. Don't be afraid to get creative!
RochesterMI48307Alex
The AuSable River
The Au Sable River in Michigan runs approximately 129 miles through the northern Lower Peninsula, through the towns of Grayling and Mio, and enters Lake Huron at Oscoda. It is considered one of the best brown trout fisheries east of the Rockies and has been designated a blue ribbon trout stream by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. In French, au sable literally means "with sand."
OscodaMI48750Kelley
Wineries of Leelanau Peninsula
In Northern Michigan's cool-climate, Michigan wines go beautifully with food and have been winning increasing national and international awards and praise each and every year. Check out this tour to find out more about the 25 wineries dotting Michigan's Leelanau Peninsula
Traverse CityMI49653Leelanau Peninsula Vintners Association
Grand Traverse Bay
This is tour of the water-side attractions you can boat to around Traverse Bay. Grand Traverse Bay is 32 miles (51 km) long, 10 miles (16 km) wide, and up to 620 feet (190 m) deep in spots. It is divided into two arms by the Old Mission Peninsula. The bay earned its name from 18th century French voyagers who made la grande traverse or "the long crossing" across the mouth of the Grand Traverse Bay. If you have a trailer-able boat, consider putting it in at Northport and sailing down to Traverse City. The BATA Shuttle (http://www.bata.net) can be taken to any of the ports between Traverse City and Northport for $3
Traverse CityMI49686Jeff
Wineries of Old Mission Peninsula
Jutting north between the azure arms of Lake Michigan's Grand Traverse Bay lies Old Mission Peninsula. Situated at the globe's 45th parallel - the ideal climate for growing varietal wine grapes - the eight distinct wineries that comprise this stunning appellation have been well recognized by international wine enthusiasts. Discover the beauty of the Old Mission Peninsula and experience its award-winning wines: Chardonnay, Riesling, Pinot Grigio, Pinot Noir, Merlot, Gewurztraminer, sparkling varieties and the prestigious ice wines.
Traverse CityMI49686Traverse City Wine Trail
Little Traverse Bay
Little Traverse Bay is a small bay, 170 feet deep, off Lake Michigan in the northern area of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. The cities of Harbor Springs and Petoskey are on this bay. The bay has significant publicly accessible parkland on the waterfront, including the Petoskey waterfront, the Harbor Springs waterfront and the Petoskey State Park.
PetoskeyMI49737Alex
Historic Mackinac Island
Mackinac Island has a population of 492 residents and as many as 15,000 tourists per day during peak season. The island features 8 miles of coastline. Motor vehicles were restricted at the end of the 19th century because of concerns for the health and safety of the island's residents and horses after local carriage drivers complained that automobiles startled their horses. The ban continues today, with exceptions for emergency and construction vehicles
Mackinac IslandMI49757Alex B
St. Louis
St. Louis was founded in 1764 and became a major port along the Mississippi River after the Louisiana Purchase. The city is best known for Gateway Arch, a 630 foot arch that dominates the skyline, but the city has a lot more to offer.
St. LouisMO63108Alex
Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone was the first national park established in the United States, and one of the most visited. The enormous park stretches into 3 states and is known for its wildlife and many geothermal features (especially Old Faithful Geyser). A study that was completed in 2011 found that at least 1283 geysers have erupted in Yellowstone. Of these, an average of 465 are active in a given year. Yellowstone contains at least 10,000 geothermal features altogether. Half the geothermal features and two-thirds of the world's geysers are concentrated in Yellowstone. As you explore Yellowstone, molten rock is heating ground water deep beneath your feet. This water follows cracks and fissures upward, forming hot springs where it escapes. Since hot water is a better solvent than cool water, it dissolves large amounts of silica beneath Earth's surface and precipitates it when the water reaches the surface.
Yellowstone National ParkWY82190Alex
Anchorage, AK
The heart of Anchorage has a city feel, but the many nearby parks and wooded trails that surround the city give visitors a chance to enjoy the wildlife in their natural habitat. Surprisingly, Anchorage is one of the best places to see moose (arguably better than Denali N.P.), and a decent place for seeing bears. Mudflats created by glacial run off and even Mt. McKinley, North America's highest peak, can even be seen from Anchorage.
AnchorageAK99501Kristen
Alaska - The Last Frontier
Alaska is an amazing state with plenty for you to do. The US purchased Alaska from Russia at a cost of 2 cents/acre in 1867, but it wasn't admitted as a state until 1959. Although this tour covers only a fraction of the state, it will give you a good taste of what Alaska is like. Plan at least 10 days for a trip such as this.
SuttonAK99674Alex
Fairbanks, Alaska
Fairbanks comes alive in the winter, but there is also plenty to do in the summer months. With the snow, comes ice carving, dog mushing, and picture perfect views of the northern lights. Though it feels much smaller than Anchorage, Fairbanks has parks, a helpful visitor's center, and several iconic statues. As you explore the city, you can learn its history and how it owes its existence to the gold, coal, and oil which have been mined from Alaska.
FairbanksAK99701Mason
Denali National Park
Denali National Park and Preserve is the third largest National Park in the United States and one of the least explored parks. The park is considered a "Trail-less park" since it contains only a handful of trails, but visitors are encouraged to leave the trail and explore nature in its most pristine condition. The park is home to North America's highest peak, Mt. McKinley, though the park was originally created to protect the Dali Sheep, which were overhunted to feed the visiting gold-miners, not the mountain. Although cars are not allowed into the park's interior, a shuttle and tour-bus system provides access to the inner reaches of the park. Be sure to pack food and drink, because you won't find any as you explore the park.
HealyAK99743Alex

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